The Metre of Jinacarita Duroiselle also includes a metrical analysis of the poem (pp. 113-121 of his edition), but it is unfortunately rather faulty and misleading.01

 

In this edition the poem consists of 472 verses, According to the last verse there should be 473 verses, so it appears one verse is missing. See the note there.02 of which 328 are written in the familiar Siloka metre (= 69%). Most of these (647 pādayugas) are pathyā in form (98%), and there are only 10 variations in the whole text: mavipulā 54b, 180c, 401a; navipulā 56b, 140a, 184c, 195c, 322a, 324c; and bhavipulā 458b, which illustrates how much the pathyā form had come to dominate Siloka composition by this time.

Pathyā:

 

Mavipulā:

Navipulā:

Bhavipulā:

⏓⏓⏓⏓¦⏑−−−¦¦⏓⏓⏓⏓¦⏑−⏑−

 

⏓⏓⏑⏓¦−−−−¦¦⏓⏓⏓⏓¦⏑−⏑−

⏓⏓⏓⏓¦⏑⏑⏑−¦¦⏓⏓⏓⏓¦⏑−⏑−

⏓⏓⏑⏓¦−⏑⏑−¦¦⏓⏓⏓⏓¦⏑−⏑−

Of the other metres the most common is Vasantatilakā, which Ven. Medhaṅkara handles particularly well. It has 14 syllables to the line, and its outline may be described thus: −−⏑−¦⏑⏑⏑−⏑⏑¦−⏑−− x 4

There are 50 verses in this metre (= 11%), including the run of 21 verses near the end of the poem which describe the Buddha's Rains Residences (vv. 75-78, 87-90, 92, 93, 98, 136, 137, 193, 220, 222, 244-253, 279, 359, 360, 436-456).

Also fairly common is the Upajāti, which normally consists of a mixture of Indavajirā and Upindavajirā lines. It is not clear whether we should count verses consisting solely of Indavajirā or Upindavajirā as Upajāti or seperately, but here I have counted them as distinct forms by themselves.03

Upajāti:

 

Indavajirā:

Upindavajirā:

⏓−⏑−¦−⏑⏑¦−⏑−− x 4

 

−−⏑−¦−⏑⏑¦−⏑−−

⏑−⏑−¦−⏑⏑¦−⏑−−

The metre in this form occurs 43 times (= 9%: vv. 42, 80, 86, 95, 99, 100, 101, 105, 106, 125, 126, 127, 128, 131, 132, 133, 134, 142, 199, 212, 265, 266, 277, 294, 295, 296, 307, 308, 309, 326, 327, 328, 347, 352, 353, 354, 395, 403, 405, 408, 421, 429). There is a verse at 230, which is mixed Upindavajirā and Vaṁsaṭṭhā, which we must also formally count as Upajāti.

Indavajirā occurs by itself 9 times: vv. 51, 91, 94, 141, 217, 280, 350, 406, 407; and Upindavajirā bvy itself 7 times: vv. 102, 103, 104, 144, 278, 349, 351. If we include Indavajirā and Upindavajirā in the Upajāti count, there are 59 verses (=13%) in all.04

Vaṁsaṭṭhā (−−⏑−¦−⏑⏑¦−⏑−⏑−) is a metre of the Jagatī class, having 12 syllables to the line, there are 18 occurrences: (= 4%) vv. 73, 74, 97, 107, 108, 109, 129, 130, 143, 148, 149, 229, 304, 305, 306, 419, 420, 422).

Bhujaṅgappayāta (⏑−−⏑−−⏑−−⏑−−) is another metre of the Jagatī class, having 12 syllables to the line, there are 5 occurrences: vv. 160, 161, 432, 433, 434.

Mālinī (⏑⏑⏑⏑⏑⏑−−,−⏑−−⏑−−) is a metre of the Atisakkarī class, having 15 syllables to the line. There are 8 occurrences: (= 2%) vv. 84, 85, 192, 336, 337, 338, 435, 457.

Rathoddhatā (−⏑−⏑⏑⏑−⏑−⏑−) is a metre of the Tuṭṭhubha class, having 11 syllables to the line. There is only one verse in this metre, v. 172.

Varivasitā This is the name given to the metre by Duroiselle in an Addenda on p. xxv. I have been unable to confirm it as yet.05 (⏑⏑−⏑⏑−⏑⏑⏑⏑⏑⏑−) is a very unusual metre of the Atijagatī class, having 13 syllables to the line. There is only one verse in this metre, v. 404.

Saddūlavikkīḷita (−−−⏑⏑−⏑−⏑⏑⏑−,−−⏑−−⏑−) is an elaborate metre of the Atidhuti class, having 19 syllables to the line. There is only one verse in this metre, v. 418.

Anandajoti Bhikkhu,
October, 2006