The Third Discourse Pali Text Society edition of Vinaya Piṭakaṁ, Vol I, The Mahāvagga, pp. 24-25 & 32-35.01

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6. The First Miracle Between the conversion of the group-of-five and that of the Kassapa brothers and their followers there are two important sections dealing with the conversion of Yasa, his family and friends, and the conversion of the thirty friends. As these incidents did not result in a discourse being recorded they have been omitted here.02
(The Dragon-King)

Then the Gracious One while walking gradually on walking tour arrived at Uruvelā. Then at that time at Uruvelā there lived three yogis: Literally: one with a tangled mass of hair, a matted hair ascetic. I use yogi to be concise.03 known as Uruvelakassapa, Nadīkassapa, and Gayākassapa. All the names arise from the place names where they dwelt: Kassapa at Uruvelā, Kassapa at the River (Nadī, i.e. Nerañjarā), and Kassapa at Gayā. The name Kassapa (Skt: Kāśyapa) itself is a brahminical clan name.04 Of these, the yogi Uruvelakassapa was the leader, guide, chief, director, and instructor of five hundred yogis. The yogi Nadīkassapa was the leader, guide, chief, director, and instructor of three hundred yogis. The yogi Gayākassapa was the leader, guide, chief, director, and instructor of two hundred yogis.

Then the Gracious One approached the yogi Uruvelakassapa's ashram, and after approaching he said this to the yogi Uruvelakassapa: “If it is not troublesome to you, Kassapa, we This is the so-called royal we, a plural that is used politely in many languages when talking about oneself.05 would stay for one night in the sacrificial firehouse.” SED: agní-gṛha, house or place for keeping the sacred fire.06 “It is not troublesome to me, Great Ascetic, (but) there is a fierce, venomous, poisonous, Dragon-king here, having psychic power, he should not (be allowed to) harass you.”

For a second time the Gracious One said this to the yogi Uruvelakassapa: “If it is not troublesome to you, Kassapa, we would stay for one night in the sacrificial firehouse.” “It is not troublesome to me, Great Ascetic, (but) there is a fierce, venomous, poisonous, Dragon-king here, having psychic power, he should not (be allowed to) harass you.”

For a third time the Gracious One said this to the yogi Uruvelakassapa: “If it is not troublesome to you, Kassapa, we would stay for one night in the sacrificial firehouse.” “It is not troublesome to me, Great Ascetic, (but) there is a fierce, venomous, poisonous, Dragon-king here, having psychic power, he should not (be allowed to) harass you.”

“It is all right, he will not harass me, come now, Kassapa, allow me the sacrificial firehouse.” “Dwell (there), Great Ascetic, according to your pleasure.”

Then the Gracious One, after entering the sacrificial firehouse and preparing a grass covering, sat down, having folded his legs crosswise, set his body straight, and established mindfulness at the front. Then the Dragon saw that the Gracious One had entered, and after seeing (him), pained, depressed, he belched out smoke.

Then this occurred to the Gracious One: “Now what if I, without having destroyed this Dragon's tegument, skin, flesh, muscle, bone, or bone-marrow, were to overcome (the Dragon's) power with (my) power?” Then the Gracious One so arranged it with his psychic powers that he (also) belched out smoke. Then that Dragon, unbearably angry, blazed forth. The Gracious One, having attained the fire-element, also blazed forth, and both of them burned so bright it was as if the sacrificial firehouse was on fire, in flames, was burning down.

Then those yogis, having surrounded the sacrificial firehouse, said this: “The Great Ascetic is surely intelligent, This meaning for abhirūpa is attested in Sanskrit, and seems much more appropriate than handsome, beautiful in the context.07 but he is harassed by the Dragon.” Then the Gracious One, with the passing of that night, without harming that Dragon's tegument, skin, flesh, muscle, bone, or bone-marrow, after overcoming (the Dragon's) power with (his own) power and dropping him into his bowl, showed (him) to the yogi Uruvelakassapa, (saying): “This is your Dragon, Kassapa, his power was overcome by (my) power.”

Then this occurred to the yogi Uruvelakassapa: “Powerful and majestic is this Great Ascetic, since he can overcome this fierce, venomous, poisonous, Dragon-King's psychic power with (his own) power, but he is surely not a Worthy One like I am.”

[many miracles omitted here]

 

7. The Ordination of Kassapa and his Followers

Then this occurred to the Gracious One: “For a long time this will occur to that foolish fellow: ‘Powerful and majestic is this Great Ascetic, but he is surely not a Worthy One like I am.’ Now what if I were to cause spiritual anxiety to this yogi?” Then the Gracious One said this to the yogi Uruvelakassapa “You are certainly not a Worthy One, Kassapa. Nor have you entered the path to Worthiness. This practice of yours is not one whereby you could be a Worthy One, or one who has entered the path to Worthiness.”

Then the yogi Uruvelakassapa, having fallen with his head at the Gracious One's feet, said this to the Gracious One: “May I receive the going-forth, venerable Sir, in the presence of the Gracious One, may I receive the full ordination.” “But you Kassapa, are the leader, guide, chief, director and instructor of five hundred yogis. You should give them permission and they can do whatever they are thinking.”

Then the yogi Uruvelakassapa approached those yogis, and after approaching he said this to those yogis: “I wish to live the spiritual life under the Great Ascetic, you, dear friends, can do whatever you are thinking.”

“For a long time, friend, we have had confidence in the Great Ascetic, if you, friend, will live the spiritual life under the Great Ascetic, all of us will live the spiritual life under the Great Ascetic.”

Then those yogis, after throwing their hair, Lit: mixing their hair, mixing their locks, etc. in the water, which sounds odd, even in Pāḷi.08 locks, pole and basket and sacred fire equipment into the water, approached the Gracious One, and after approaching and falling with their heads at the feet of the Gracious One, they said this to the Gracious One: “May we receive the going-forth, venerable Sir, in the presence of the Gracious One, may we receive the full ordination.”

“Come, monks,” said the Gracious One, “the Dhamma has been well-proclaimed, live the spiritual life for the complete ending of suffering.” That was these venerable ones’ full ordination.

The yogi Nadīkassapa saw the hair, locks, pole and basket and sacred fire equipment floating in the water, and after seeing (them), this occurred to him: “Let there be no danger for my brothers,” and he sent yogis, (saying): “Go and find out about my brothers,” and he together with three hundred yogis approached the venerable Uruvelakassapa, and after approaching he said this to the venerable Uruvelakassapa: “Is this better, Kassapa?” “Yes, friend, this is better.”

Then those yogis, after throwing their hair, locks, pole and basket and sacred fire equipment into the water, approached the Gracious One, and after approaching and falling with their heads at the feet of the Gracious One, they said this to the Gracious One: “May we receive the going-forth, venerable Sir, in the presence of the Gracious One, may we receive the full ordination.”

“Come, monks,” said the Gracious One, “the Dhamma has been well-proclaimed, live the spiritual life for the complete ending of suffering.” That was these venerable ones’ full ordination.

The yogi Gayākassapa saw the hair, locks, pole and basket and sacred fire equipment floating in the water, and after seeing (them), this occurred to him: “Let there be no danger for my brothers,” and he sent yogis, (saying): “Go and find out about my brothers,” and he together with two hundred yogis approached the venerable Uruvelakassapa, and after approaching he said this to the venerable Uruvelakassapa: “Is this better, Kassapa?” “Yes, friend, this is better.”

Then those yogis, after throwing their hair, locks, pole and basket and sacred fire equipment into the water, approached the Gracious One, and after approaching and falling with their heads at the feet of the Gracious One, they said this to the Gracious One: “May we receive the going-forth, venerable Sir, in the presence of the Gracious One, may we receive the full ordination.”

“Come, monks,” said the Gracious One, “the Dhamma has been well-proclaimed, live the spiritual life for the complete ending of suffering.” That was these venerable ones’ full ordination.

 

8. The Instruction About Burning

Then the Gracious One, having dwelt at Uruvelā for as long as he liked, left on walking tour for Gayā's Head, together with a great Community of monks, with a thousand monks all of whom were formerly yogis. There the Gracious One dwelt near Gayā, on Gayā's Head together with a thousand monks.

There the Gracious One addressed the monks, (saying): “All is burning, monks. What all is burning, monks? The eye is burning, monks, forms are burning, The analysis that follows here is of the internal and external sense-spheres (āyatanāni) skilfully applied to the fire-worshippers, showing what is really burning, and what it is burning with.09 eye-consciousness is burning, eye-contact is burning, and whatever feeling arises dependent on eye-contact, whether pleasant, unpleasant, or neither-unpleasant-nor-pleasant, that also is burning.

With what is it burning? It is burning with the fire of passion, with the fire of hatred, with the fire of delusion. It is burning with birth, with old age and death, with griefs, with lamentations, with pains, with sorrows, and with despairs, I say.

The ear is burning, sounds are burning, ear-consciousness is burning, ear-contact is burning, and whatever feeling arises dependent on ear-contact, whether pleasant, unpleasant, or neither-unpleasant-nor-pleasant, that also is burning.

With what is it burning? It is burning with the fire of passion, with the fire of hatred, with the fire of delusion. It is burning with birth, with old age and death, with griefs, with lamentations, with pains, with sorrows, and with despairs, I say.

The nose is burning, scents are burning, nose-consciousness is burning, nose-contact is burning, and whatever feeling arises dependent on nose-contact, whether pleasant, unpleasant, or neither-unpleasant-nor-pleasant, that also is burning.

With what is it burning? It is burning with the fire of passion, with the fire of hatred, with the fire of delusion. It is burning with birth, with old age and death, with griefs, with lamentations, with pains, with sorrows, and with despairs, I say.

The tongue is burning, tastes are burning, tongue-consciousness is burning, tongue-contact is burning, and whatever feeling arises dependent on tongue-contact, whether pleasant, unpleasant, or neither-unpleasant-nor-pleasant, that also is burning.

With what is it burning? It is burning with the fire of passion, with the fire of hatred, with the fire of delusion. It is burning with birth, with old age and death, with griefs, with lamentations, with pains, with sorrows, and with despairs, I say.

The body is burning, tangibles are burning, body-consciousness is burning, body-contact is burning, and whatever feeling arises dependent on body-contact, whether pleasant, unpleasant, or neither-unpleasant-nor-pleasant, that also is burning.

With what is it burning? It is burning with the fire of passion, with the fire of hatred, with the fire of delusion. It is burning with birth, with old age and death, with griefs, with lamentations, with pains, with sorrows, and with despairs, I say.

The mind is burning, thoughts are burning, mind-consciousness is burning, mind-contact is burning, and whatever feeling arises dependent on mind-contact, whether pleasant, unpleasant, or neither-unpleasant-nor-pleasant, that also is burning.

With what is it burning? It is burning with the fire of passion, with the fire of hatred, with the fire of delusion. It is burning with birth, with old age and death, with griefs, with lamentations, with pains, with sorrows, and with despairs, I say.

Seeing this, monks, the learned Noble disciple grows weary of the eye, grows weary of forms, grows weary of eye-consciousness, grows weary of eye-contact, and whatever feeling that arises dependent on eye-contact, whether pleasant, unpleasant, or neither-unpleasant-nor-pleasant, he also grows weary of that.

He grows weary of the ear, grows weary of sounds, grows weary of ear-consciousness, grows weary of ear-contact, and whatever feeling that arises dependent on ear-contact, whether pleasant, unpleasant, or neither-unpleasant-nor-pleasant, he also grows weary of that.

He grows weary of the nose, grows weary of scents, grows weary of nose-consciousness, grows weary of nose-contact, and whatever feeling that arises dependent on nose-contact, whether pleasant, unpleasant, or neither-unpleasant-nor-pleasant, he also grows weary of that.

He grows weary of the tongue, grows weary of tastes, grows weary of tongue-consciousness, grows weary of tongue-contact, and whatever feeling that arises dependent on tongue-contact, whether pleasant, unpleasant, or neither-unpleasant-nor-pleasant, he also grows weary of that.

He grows weary of the body, grows weary of tangibles, grows weary of body-consciousness, grows weary of body-contact, and whatever feeling that arises dependent on body-contact, whether pleasant, unpleasant, or neither-unpleasant-nor-pleasant, he also grows weary of that.

He grows weary of the mind, grows weary of thoughts, grows weary of mind-consciousness, grows weary of mind-contact, and whatever feeling that arises dependent on mind-contact, whether pleasant, unpleasant, or neither-unpleasant-nor-pleasant, he also grows weary of that, through weariness he becomes dispassionate, through dispassion he is liberated, in liberation, there is the knowledge that such is liberation:

‘Destroyed is (re)birth
accomplished is the spiritual life
done is what ought to be done
there is no more of this mundane state’ - this he knows.

Moreover, as this sermon was being given, those one thousand monks’ minds were liberated from the pollutants, without attachment. According to Mahāvastu the Buddha converted another 250 yogis who were followers of Upasena (perhaps this means Sāriputta's brother, who later became a monk); he also taught the Chapter of the Thousands of the Dharmapada in Uruvilvakāśyapa's ashram before leaving for Rājagṛha.10