Udāna 2: Mucalindavaggo
The Chapter (including the Discourse) About Mucalinda

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4: The Discourse about Veneration

 

Thus I heard:
at one time the Gracious One was dwelling near Sāvatthī, in Jeta's Wood, at Anāthapiṇḍika's monastery.

Then at that time the Gracious One was venerated, respected, revered, honoured, esteemed, and in receipt of robes, almsfood, dwellings, and medicinal requisites to help when sick; also the Community of monks were venerated, respected, revered, honoured, esteemed, and in receipt of robes, almsfood, dwellings, and medicinal requisites to help when sick.

But wanderers from other sects were not venerated, not respected, not revered, not honoured, not esteemed, nor were they in receipt of robes, almsfood, dwellings, and medicinal requisites to help when sick. Then those wanderers from other sects, being unable to bear the veneration of the Gracious One and the Community of monks, after seeing the monks in the village or the wilderness, with vulgar and rough words scolded, abused, annoyed, and troubled them.

Then many monks went to the Gracious One, and after going and worshipping the Gracious One, they sat down on one side. While sat on one side those monks said this to the Gracious One: “At present, reverend Sir, the Gracious One is venerated, respected, revered, honoured, esteemed, and in receipt of robes, almsfood, dwellings, and medicinal requisites to help when sick; also the Community of monks are venerated, respected, revered, honoured, esteemed, and in receipt of robes, almsfood, dwellings, and medicinal requisites to help when sick.

But wanderers from other sects are not venerated, not respected, not revered, not honoured, not esteemed, nor are they in receipt of robes, almsfood, dwellings, and medicinal requisites to help when sick. Then those wanderers from other sects, reverend Sir, being unable to bear the veneration of the Gracious One and the Community of monks, after seeing the monks in the village or the wilderness, with vulgar and rough words scold, abuse, annoy, and trouble them.”

Then the Gracious One, having understood the significance of it, on that occasion uttered this exalted utterance:

“Affected by pleasure and pain in the village or wilderness,
you should certainly not consider it as due to oneself or another.
Contacts affect one with cleaving as condition, Phassā is derived from the verb phusanti, so a more literal translation might be: contacts contact one..., but it seems to me to be unidiomatic in English.01
How could contacts affect one without cleaving?”