The Discourse about the Ways of Attending to Mindfulness

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Contemplation of (the Nature of) Things

The Section on the Constituents (of Mind & Matter)

Moreover, monks, a monk dwells contemplating (the nature of) things in (various) things, in the five constituents (of mind and body) that provide fuel for attachment. Upādāna has two meanings, attachment and fuel, and they are probably both implied in this context, hence the translation adopted here. Pañcakkhandha is commonly translated as the five aggregates, which had me scurrying to the dictionary when I first encountered it, as I had no idea what aggregate could mean in such a context. What it actually means, in more lucid English, is constituent, which is the translation adopted here. As what they constitute may not be altogether clear there is the explanatory addition in brackets.01

And how, monks, does a monk dwell contemplating (the nature of) things in (various) things, in the five constituents (of mind and body) that provide fuel for attachment?

Here, monks, a monk (knows): “such is form, such is the origination of form, such is the passing away of form; such is feeling, such is the origination of feeling, such is the passing away of feeling; such is perception, such is the origination of perception, such is the passing away of perception; such are (mental) processes, such is the origination of (mental) processes, such is the passing away of (mental) processes; such is consciousness, such is the origination of consciousness, such is the passing away of consciousness”.

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Thus he dwells contemplating (the nature of) things in (various) things in regard to himself, or he dwells contemplating (the nature of) things in (various) things in regard to others, or he dwells contemplating (the nature of) things in (various) things in regard to himself and in regard to others, or he dwells contemplating the nature of origination in things, or he dwells contemplating the nature of dissolution in things, or he dwells contemplating the nature of origination and dissolution in things, or else mindfulness that “there are these (various) things” is established in him just as far as (is necessary for) a full measure of knowledge and a full measure of mindfulness, and he dwells independent, and without being attached to anything in the world.

In this way, monks, a monk dwells contemplating (the nature of) things in (various) things, in the five constituents (of mind and body) that provide fuel for attachment.

The Section on the Constituents is Finished