Iriyāpathapabbaṁ
The Section about the Postures

 

Puna ca paraṁ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu gacchanto vā “gacchāmī” ti pajānāti; This is where the idea that sati is mere awareness breaks down irretrievably, because as the commentary says: tattha kāmaṁ soṇasiṅgālādayo pi gacchantā gacchāmā ti jānanti ... attasaññaṁ na ugghāṭeti kammaṭṭhānaṁ vā satipaṭṭhānabhāvanā vā na hoti; even animals like dogs and jackals know they are going when they are going ... but they do not uproot the perception of a self and cannot be said to be attending to mindfulness or a (proper) meditation subject. We see that mindfulness as taught here is always mindfulness of the true nature of reality, which is the liberating factor.01
Moreover, monks, a monk while going knows “I go”;

ṭhito vā “ṭhitomhī” ti pajānāti, nisinno vā “nisinnomhī” ti pajānāti;
or, standing he knows “I am standing”; or, sitting he knows “I am sitting”;

sayāno vā “sayānomhī” ti pajānāti;
or, while lying down he knows “I am lying down”;

yathā yathā The reduplication of the adverb gives it a distributive sense, in whatever way.02 vā panassa kāyo paṇihito hoti, tathā tathā naṁ pajānāti. The grammar of this section is rather odd and asymmetric. Gacchanto and sayāno are both present participles; ṭhito & nisinno are both past participles. If gacchanto takes the present indicative gacchāmi, we might have expected that sayāno would take sayāmi, but it doesn't - it takes the participle form with the auxiliary amhi (from atthi), as do the past participles.

For that matter why the past participles are used at all and not the present participles is also not clear; and why they don't all take their respective present indicatives is hard to explain, it may be simply a matter of idiom.
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or, in whatever way his body is disposed, he knows it is (disposed) in that way.

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Iti ajjhattaṁ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati,
Thus he dwells contemplating (the nature of) the body in the body in regard to himself,

bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati,
or he dwells contemplating (the nature of) the body in the body in regard to others,

ajjhattabahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati,
or he dwells contemplating (the nature of) the body in the body in regard to himself and in regard to others,

samudayadhammānupassī vā kāyasmiṁ viharati,
or he dwells contemplating the nature of origination in the body,

vayadhammānupassī vā kāyasmiṁ viharati,
or he dwells contemplating the nature of dissolution in the body,

samudayavayadhammānupassī vā kāyasmiṁ viharati,
or he dwells contemplating the nature of origination and dissolution in the body,

“atthi kāyo” ti vā panassa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti
or else mindfulness that “there is a body” is established in him

yāvad-eva ñāṇamattāya patissatimattāya,
just as far as (is necessary for) a full measure of knowledge and a full measure of mindfulness,

anissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci loke upādiyati.
and he dwells independent, and without being attached to anything in the world.

Evam-pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati.
In this way, monks, a monk dwells contemplating (the nature of) the body in the body.

Iriyāpathapabbaṁ Niṭṭhitaṁ
The Section about the Postures is Finished