Sampajānapabbaṁ
The Section about Full Awareness

 

Puna ca paraṁ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu abhikkante paṭikkante Throughout this section we find the use of the locative absolute giving durative sense, which is an idiom that can also be employed in the translation.01 sampajānakārī hoti; Comm: Tattha, sātthakasampajaññaṁ sappāyasampajaññaṁ gocarasampajaññaṁ asammohasampajaññan-ti catubbidhaṁ sampajaññaṁ; herein, there are four kinds of full awareness: full awareness of the purpose [of going], full awareness of the suitability [of going], full awareness of resort [where one is going], full awareness of non-delusion [while going].02
Moreover, monks, a monk in going forwards, in going back, is one who practises with full awareness;

ālokite vilokite sampajānakārī hoti;
in looking ahead, or in looking around, he is one who practises with full awareness;

sammiñjite pasārite sampajānakārī hoti;
in bending or in stretching, he is one who practises with full awareness;

saṅghāṭipattacīvaradhāraṇe sampajānakārī hoti;
in bearing his double-robe, bowl, and (other) robes, he is one who practises with full awareness;

asite pīte khāyite sāyite sampajānakārī hoti;
in eating, in drinking, in chewing, in tasting, he is one who practises with full awareness;

uccārapassāvakamme sampajānakārī hoti;
in passing stool and urine, he is one who practises with full awareness;

gate ṭhite nisinne; sutte jāgarite; bhāsite tuṇhībhāve sampajānakārī hoti. This section emphasises that on all occasions during one's daily life one can maintain mindfulness, as long as one keeps in mind the true nature of the body, and doesn't cling to it, but that is only possible if one doesn't get caught up in daily activities, and therefore forgetful of the nature of reality.03
in going, in standing, in sitting; in sleeping, in waking; in talking, and in maintaining silence, he is one who practises with full awareness.

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Iti ajjhattaṁ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati,
Thus he dwells contemplating (the nature of) the body in the body in regard to himself,

bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati,
or he dwells contemplating (the nature of) the body in the body in regard to others,

ajjhattabahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati,
or he dwells contemplating (the nature of) the body in the body in regard to himself and in regard to others,

samudayadhammānupassī vā kāyasmiṁ viharati,
or he dwells contemplating the nature of origination in the body,

vayadhammānupassī vā kāyasmiṁ viharati,
or he dwells contemplating the nature of dissolution in the body,

samudayavayadhammānupassī vā kāyasmiṁ viharati,
or he dwells contemplating the nature of origination and dissolution in the body,

“atthi kāyo” ti vā panassa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti
or else mindfulness that “there is a body” is established in him

yāvad-eva ñāṇamattāya patissatimattāya,
just as far as (is necessary for) a full measure of knowledge and a full measure of mindfulness,

anissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci loke upādiyati.
and he dwells independent, and without being attached to anything in the world.

Evam-pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati.
In this way, monks, a monk dwells contemplating (the nature of) the body in the body.

Sampajānapabbaṁ Niṭṭhitaṁ
The Section about Full Awareness is Finished