Dhātumanasikārapabbaṁ
The Section about Applying the Mind to the Elements

 

Puna ca paraṁ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu imam-eva kāyaṁ,
Moreover, monks, a monk, in regard to this very body,

yathāṭhitaṁ yathāpaṇihitaṁ dhātuso It appears from Wijesekera's Syntax (§133 c.) that the -so ending in dhātuso and elsewhere is not an historical ablative case form at all, but was originally an adverb that seems later to have been adopted into the ablative declension in popular speech. It then gives the varied ideas of relation (as here) and distribution, as in bilaso 4 lines below.01 paccavekkhati:
however placed, however disposed, reflects by way of the elements:

“Atthi imasmiṁ kāye,
“There are in this body,

paṭhavīdhātu āpodhātu tejodhātu vāyodhātū” ti.
the earth element, the water element, the fire element, the wind element.”

 

Seyyathā pi, bhikkhave, dakkho goghātako vā goghātakantevāsī vā,
Just as though, monks, a clever butcher, or a butcher's apprentice,

gāviṁ vadhitvā cātummahāpathe bilaso vibhajitvā nisinno assa;
after slaughtering a cow, were sitting down at a crossroads after dividing it into portions;

 

evam-eva kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu imam-eva kāyaṁ,
even so, monks, a monk in regard to this very body,

yathāṭhitaṁ yathāpaṇihitaṁ dhātuso paccavekkhati:
however placed, however disposed, reflects by way of the elements:

“Atthi imasmiṁ kāye,
“There are in this body,

paṭhavīdhātu āpodhātu tejodhātu vāyodhātū” ti.
the earth element, the water element, the fire element, the wind element.”

* * *

Iti ajjhattaṁ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati,
Thus he dwells contemplating (the nature of) the body in the body in regard to himself,

bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati,
or he dwells contemplating (the nature of) the body in the body in regard to others,

ajjhattabahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati,
or he dwells contemplating (the nature of) the body in the body in regard to himself and in regard to others,

samudayadhammānupassī vā kāyasmiṁ viharati,
or he dwells contemplating the nature of origination in the body,

vayadhammānupassī vā kāyasmiṁ viharati,
or he dwells contemplating the nature of dissolution in the body,

samudayavayadhammānupassī vā kāyasmiṁ viharati,
or he dwells contemplating the nature of origination and dissolution in the body,

“atthi kāyo” ti vā panassa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti
or else mindfulness that “there is a body” is established in him

yāvad-eva ñāṇamattāya patissatimattāya,
just as far as (is necessary for) a full measure of knowledge and a full measure of mindfulness,

anissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci loke upādiyati.
and he dwells independent, and without being attached to anything in the world.

Evam-pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati.
In this way, monks, a monk dwells contemplating (the nature of) the body in the body.

Dhātumanasikārapabbaṁ Niṭṭhitaṁ
The Section about Applying the Mind to the Elements is Finished