Tatiyaṁ Sīvathikaṁ
The Third Charnel Ground

 

Puna ca paraṁ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu seyyathā pi
Moreover, monks, it's as if a monk

passeyya sarīraṁ sīvathikāya chaḍḍitaṁ,
might see a body thrown into a charnel ground,

aṭṭhisaṅkhalikaṁ samaṁsalohitaṁ nahārusambaddhaṁ. PTS abbreviates this section and the next 3 sections in such a way that it is difficult to reconstruct the text.01
a skeleton, with flesh and blood, bound together by tendons.

So imam-eva kāyaṁ upasaṁharati:
He then compares it with his very own body (thinking):

“Ayam-pi kho kāyo evaṁdhammo evaṁbhāvī etaṁ anatīto” ti.
“This body also has such a nature, has such a constitution, has not gone beyond this.”

* * *

Iti ajjhattaṁ vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati,
Thus he dwells contemplating (the nature of) the body in the body in regard to himself,

bahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati,
or he dwells contemplating (the nature of) the body in the body in regard to others,

ajjhattabahiddhā vā kāye kāyānupassī viharati,
or he dwells contemplating (the nature of) the body in the body in regard to himself and in regard to others,

samudayadhammānupassī vā kāyasmiṁ viharati,
or he dwells contemplating the nature of origination in the body,

vayadhammānupassī vā kāyasmiṁ viharati,
or he dwells contemplating the nature of dissolution in the body,

samudayavayadhammānupassī vā kāyasmiṁ viharati,
or he dwells contemplating the nature of origination and dissolution in the body,

“atthi kāyo” ti vā panassa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti
or else mindfulness that “there is a body” is established in him

yāvad-eva ñāṇamattāya patissatimattāya,
just as far as (is necessary for) a full measure of knowledge and a full measure of mindfulness,

anissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci loke upādiyati.
and he dwells independent, and without being attached to anything in the world.

Evam-pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu kāye kāyānupassī viharati.
In this way, monks, a monk dwells contemplating (the nature of) the body in the body.

(Tatiyaṁ Sīvathikaṁ)
(The Third Charnel Ground)