Āyatanapabbaṁ
The Section on the Sense-Spheres

 

Puna ca paraṁ, bhikkhave, bhikkhu dhammesu dhammānupassī viharati,
Moreover, monks, a monk dwells contemplating (the nature of) things in (various) things,

chasu ajjhattikabāhiresu āyatanesu. In the Dhamma the sense-spheres include the five physical senses as well as the mind. These are then further divided into the internal sense-spheres: eye, ear, nose, tongue, body and mind; and their external equivalents: forms, sounds, smells, tastes, tangibles and thoughts. These form the basis for sensual attachment.01
in the six internal and external sense-spheres.

Kathañ-ca, bhikkhave, bhikkhu dhammesu dhammānupassī viharati,
And how, monks, does a monk dwell contemplating (the nature of) things in (various) things,

chasu ajjhattikabāhiresu āyatanesu?
in the six internal and external sense-spheres?

 

Idha, bhikkhave, bhikkhu cakkhuñ-ca pajānāti, rūpe ca pajānāti;
Here, monks, a monk knows the eye, and he knows forms;

yañ-ca tad-ubhayaṁ This is an important principle in the Dhamma: the fetter is not the eye, and similarly it is not the form (and not the ear or sound, nor any of the other pairs mentioned). The fetter arises dependent on them, but it is the mental defilement which is the fetter, and it is perfectly possible to have eyes and forms without the fetter (see SN 41.1).02 paṭicca uppajjati saññojanaṁ Ten fetters are mentioned in the commentary (to MN 10): the passion for sense-desire (kāmarāga), revulsion (paṭigha), conceit (māna), views (diṭṭhi), doubt (vicikicchā), grasping at virtue and practice (sīlabbataparāmāsa), passion for existence (bhavarāga), jealousy (issā), selfishness (macchariya) and ignorance (āvijjā). This is an Abhidhammic list, which differs from the fetters normally listed in the discourses (at DN 6, etc.)03 tañ-ca pajānāti.
and the fetter that arises dependent on the pair of them – that also he knows.

Yathā ca anuppannassa saññojanassa uppādo hoti tañ-ca pajānāti;
How there is an arising of a fetter that has not arisen – that he knows;

yathā ca uppannassa saññojanassa pahānaṁ hoti tañ-ca pajānāti;
and how there is an abandonment of a fetter that has arisen – that also he knows;

yathā ca pahīnassa saññojanassa āyatiṁ anuppādo hoti According to the commentary here views, doubt, grasping at virtue and practice, jealousy and selfishness are thrown off at the first stage of Awakening (sotāpatti); gross sense-desire and revulsion by the second stage (sakadāgāmitā) and even subtle forms of the same by the third stage (anāgāmitā); and conceit, passion for existence and ignorance by the fourth and final stage (arahatta).04 tañ-ca pajānāti.
and how there is a non-arising of an abandoned fetter again in the future – that also he knows.

 

Sotañ-ca pajānāti, sadde ca pajānāti,
He knows the ear, and he knows sounds,

yañ-ca tad-ubhayaṁ paṭicca uppajjati saññojanaṁ tañ-ca pajānāti.
and the fetter that arises dependent on the pair of them – that also he knows.

Yathā ca anuppannassa saññojanassa uppādo hoti tañ-ca pajānāti;
How there is an arising of a fetter that has not arisen – that he knows;

yathā ca uppannassa saññojanassa pahānaṁ hoti tañ-ca pajānāti;
and how there is an abandonment of a fetter that has arisen – that also he knows;

yathā ca pahīnassa saññojanassa āyatiṁ anuppādo hoti tañ-ca pajānāti.
and how there is a non-arising of an abandoned fetter again in the future – that also he knows.

 

Ghānañ-ca pajānāti, gandhe ca pajānāti,
He knows the nose, and he knows smells,

yañ-ca tad-ubhayaṁ paṭicca uppajjati saññojanaṁ tañ-ca pajānāti.
and the fetter that arises dependent on the pair of them – that also he knows.

Yathā ca anuppannassa saññojanassa uppādo hoti tañ-ca pajānāti;
How there is an arising of a fetter that has not arisen – that he knows;

yathā ca uppannassa saññojanassa pahānaṁ hoti tañ-ca pajānāti;
and how there is an abandonment of a fetter that has arisen – that also he knows;

yathā ca pahīnassa saññojanassa āyatiṁ anuppādo hoti tañ-ca pajānāti.
and how there is a non-arising of an abandoned fetter again in the future – that also he knows.

 

Jivhañ-ca pajānāti, rase ca pajānāti,
He knows the tongue, and he knows tastes,

yañ-ca tad-ubhayaṁ paṭicca uppajjati saññojanaṁ tañ-ca pajānāti.
and the fetter that arises dependent on the pair of them – that also he knows.

Yathā ca anuppannassa saññojanassa uppādo hoti tañ-ca pajānāti;
How there is an arising of a fetter that has not arisen – that he knows;

yathā ca uppannassa saññojanassa pahānaṁ hoti tañ-ca pajānāti;
and how there is an abandonment of a fetter that has arisen – that also he knows;

yathā ca pahīnassa saññojanassa āyatiṁ anuppādo hoti tañ-ca pajānāti.
and how there is a non-arising of an abandoned fetter again in the future – that also he knows.

 

Kāyañ-ca pajānāti, phoṭṭhabbe ca pajānāti,
He knows the body, and he knows tangibles,

yañ-ca tad-ubhayaṁ paṭicca uppajjati saññojanaṁ tañ-ca pajānāti.
and the fetter that arises dependent on the pair of them – that also he knows.

Yathā ca anuppannassa saññojanassa uppādo hoti tañ-ca pajānāti;
How there is an arising of a fetter that has not arisen – that he knows;

yathā ca uppannassa saññojanassa pahānaṁ hoti tañ-ca pajānāti;
and how there is an abandonment of a fetter that has arisen – that also he knows;

yathā ca pahīnassa saññojanassa āyatiṁ anuppādo hoti tañ-ca pajānāti.
and how there is a non-arising of an abandoned fetter again in the future – that also he knows.

 

Manañ-ca pajānāti, dhamme ca pajānāti,
He knows the mind, and he knows thoughts,

yañ-ca tad-ubhayaṁ paṭicca uppajjati saññojanaṁ tañ-ca pajānāti.
and the fetter that arises dependent on the pair of them – that also he knows.

Yathā ca anuppannassa saññojanassa uppādo hoti tañ-ca pajānāti;
How there is an arising of a fetter that has not arisen – that he knows;

yathā ca uppannassa saññojanassa pahānaṁ hoti tañ-ca pajānāti;
and how there is an abandonment of a fetter that has arisen – that also he knows;

yathā ca pahīnassa saññojanassa āyatiṁ anuppādo hoti tañ-ca pajānāti.
and how there is a non-arising of an abandoned fetter again in the future – that also he knows.

* * *

Iti ajjhattaṁ vā dhammesu dhammānupassī viharati,
Thus he dwells contemplating (the nature of) things in (various) things in regard to himself,

bahiddhā vā dhammesu dhammānupassī viharati,
or he dwells contemplating (the nature of) things in (various) things in regard to others,

ajjhattabahiddhā vā dhammesu dhammānupassī viharati,
or he dwells contemplating (the nature of) things in (various) things in regard to himself and in regard to others,

samudayadhammānupassī vā dhammesu viharati,
or he dwells contemplating the nature of origination in things,

vayadhammānupassī vā dhammesu viharati,
or he dwells contemplating the nature of dissolution in things,

samudayavayadhammānupassī vā dhammesu viharati,
or he dwells contemplating the nature of origination and dissolution in things,

“atthi dhammā” ti vā panassa sati paccupaṭṭhitā hoti
or else mindfulness that “there are these (various) things” is established in him

yāvad-eva ñāṇamattāya patissatimattāya,
just as far as (is necessary for) a full measure of knowledge and a full measure of mindfulness,

anissito ca viharati, na ca kiñci loke upādiyati.
and he dwells independent, and without being attached to anything in the world.

Evam-pi kho, bhikkhave, bhikkhu dhammesu dhammānupassī viharati,
In this way, monks, a monk dwells contemplating (the nature of) things in (various) things,

chasu ajjhattikabāhiresu āyatanesu.
in the six internal and external sense-spheres.

Āyatanapabbaṁ Niṭṭhitaṁ
The Section on the Sense-Spheres is Finished